Archive | Lactose in the News

Lactic intolerance linked to lower vitamin D levels — Medical News Today


A new study suggests that people with a genetic intolerance to lactose ought to increase their intake of non-dairy meals rich in vitamin D, after finding that they may be more likely to have low levels of the essential nutrient.

Study co-author Ahmed El-Sohemy, a professor associated with nutrition at the University of Toronto’s Faculty of Medicine in North america, and colleagues recently reported their own findings in the Journal of Nutrition .

Lactose intolerance is defined as the body’s inability to effectively digest lactose, a sugar found in dairy products, including milk, butter, and cheese.

The problem occurs when the small intestine fails to produce sufficient amounts of lactase, that is the enzyme that breaks down lactose.

If a person along with lactose intolerance consumes dairy products, they may encounter bloating, flatulence, diarrhea, nausea, and abdominal pain. These symptoms usually arise around 30 minutes to 2 hours after lactose consumption.

It really is unclear precisely how many people are living along with lactose intolerance, but estimates suggest that around 65 percent of the population encounter a reduced ability to digest lactose following infancy.

One reason for lactose intolerance is mutations in the LCT gene, which is the gene responsible for lactase production.


Individuals with lactose intolerance should be aware of vitamin D intake

From an analysis of 1, 495 men and women who were a part of the particular Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Research, El-Sohemy and colleagues found that individuals who possessed LCT gene variations had a lower intake of dairy products, compared with the general population.

Individuals with LCT gene variations also had lower blood amounts of vitamin D, which the team says is likely down to reduced intake of dairy products, since these are often fortified along with vitamin D.

“We were not surprised that lactose intolerant people ate less dairy, inch says El-Sohemy, “but we were surprised that they did not compensate by supplementing your or eating other foods fortified with this crucial nutrient. ”

Vitamin D is considered essential for the particular absorption of calcium in the gut, which is important for good bone wellness. The vitamin also aids nerve functioning and helps the body in order to stave off bacteria and viruses.

Interestingly, the scientists found that people with LCT gene mutations were shorter than people in the general population, which indicates that reduced intake of calciferol through lack of dairy consumption might be inhibiting bone growth.

El-Sohemy and colleagues declare their findings suggest that people with lactic intolerance should consider increasing their intake of vitamin D through non-dairy food sources.


These findings speak to the need for greater awareness for those who limit dairy because of lactose intolerance. They need to be mindful of obtaining enough vitamin D from other fortified meals like certain brands of orange juice, or to consider trying lactose-free dairy products. ”

Ahmed El-Sohemy

Another getting of the study was that individuals with just one mutated copy of LCT shown an intolerance to lactose, yet to lesser degree than those with two mutated copies; it was previously thought that two mutated copies of the gene were required for lactose intolerance to arise.

According to the experts, this finding indicates that scientific definitions and genetic classifications just for lactose intolerance may need to be reviewed.

Learn how sunscreen may lead to vitamin D deficiency.


Contact our news editors

For any corrections of factual information, or to contact our editorial team, please notice our contact page.

Please note: Any kind of medical information published on this web site is not intended as a substitute for up to date medical advice and you should not take any actions before consulting with a health care professional. To find out more, please read our terms of use.

Copyright Healthcare News Today: Not including email/sharing services explicitly offered about this website, material published on Healthcare News Today may not be reproduced, or distributed without the prior written permission of Medilexicon International Ltd. Make sure you contact us for further details.

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

Dairy producers influence people’s lives plus daily nutritional needs – Iowa Farmer Today

œIn terms of the nutritional bang for the money, there™s probably nothing better than a glass of milk, ” UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Secretary Vilsack said recently when he addressed the U. S. House Committee on Education plus Workforce.

Despite milk™s nutritional appeal and the fact the particular U. S. is now the world™s largest cheese-exporting country, the dairy industry in the U. S. goes through yet another episode of reduced market prices for raw whole milk.

Many dairy functions barely recovered from a milk price recession that began around 08 and continued through most of the next five years. Innovative operations thrived, but many marginalized operations ceased, highlighting the ongoing modernization and combination within the industry.

Worldwide, there is currently a lot of milk offered. Cows and other dairy animals nearly everywhere are producing more whole milk per animal, as well as specific types of milk suited for particular products like heavy cream.

Within the competition for economic gain, the has become cutthroat to the point that actually fewer dairy farmers can survive within traditional bovine operations, especially the ones that are small and use outmoded facilities.

Dairy makers in Canada, Europe, Australia and most exporting countries say they have the economic pressures, too.

The glut of milk out there comes at a bad time meant for producers. Consumption of fluid milk continues to be decreasing for several decades in the U. S and falling behind some other beverages.

According to a current Huffington Post article, in 2011 the standard American drank 20. 4 gallons of milk, as compared to 44. seven gallons of soda, 28. 3 or more gallons of bottled water, 20. 6 gallons of beer, 18. five gallons of coffee, 11. five gallons of fruit juices and 10. 3 gallons of tea.

There are many shifts in market trends for dairy producers to ponder. Organic milk producers have found ever more customers for their milk.

Independent dairy producers who disperse their products through their own stores, such as home delivery and specialized cheese shops, are finding profitable niches.

Currently, almost half of all U. S. raw whole milk is processed into cheese, butter, yogurt, ice cream and other dairy products. Consumption of most dairy items has continued to be fairly steady over the past several years, except for cheese and yogurt, which are improving considerably among U. S. occupants.

Consumers like to try out new foods, which may explain the reason why they like milk from water buffalo for mozzarella and ricotta cheeses and milk from goats, sheep and camels that provide unique-tasting foods.

There is interest among adventurous Americans to try airag, a mildly alcoholic drink that Mongolians derive from fermented mares™ milk, as well as to sample butter tea, a staple drink amongst Tibetans and other Himalayan people.

Milk is nature™s most complete food. We associate drinking whole milk with good health.

Besides being the first food most humans and mammals consume, milk remains an important part of many people™s diet programs throughout life, whether it is produced by animals or derived from soybeans, almonds, coconuts or other plants.

Seeking mothers™ milk is designed into our genetic makeup, meant for infants are born with a stroking reflex. That infants of most mammalian species benefit from colostrum for condition resistance during early infancy also supports the genetic proclivity to crave milk early in life.

Lactose intolerance is suppressed in humans until babies achieve several months of age. Many humans lack the ability to digest lactose after early childhood.

Most people of European source and any regions that have relied on milk from cows or even other mammals for centuries have a preponderance of people who can tolerate lactose right after infancy, but people from ethnicities that did not keep dairy animals often don™t tolerate lactose well.

Now that milk-processing methods can remove lactose, lactose-intolerant occupants of such traditional non-dairy nations as China and Japan don™t develop milk-induced tummy aches anymore and now enjoy ice cream, cheese plus fluid milk.

Is time another œhang-in-there” episode or a signal for milk producers to change something?

It™s a tough call to make a change in farming methods at a time when profits are usually hard to come by. Fortunately, feed costs are usually lower for most producers, especially for feed, than during some recent years. Damp weather made it difficult to harvest rain-free alfalfa hay in many parts of the particular U. S. this year, so high-quality hay is the exception.

Dairy producers might want to explore possibilities for modifying their businesses simply by conferring with milk processors regarding specialty markets and by attending workshops and dairy industry conferences to consider options to improve the efficiency of the operations.

Dairy makers should be sure to check at nearby Farm Service Agency offices meant for catastrophic margin protections and indemnity for lost animals that could advantage some producers.

Happily for dairy farmers and people generally, almost everyone likes milk in some form.


Doctor Mike Rosmann says he milked too many cows by hand while growing up and he is happy that some other dairy producers now handle these responsibilities, even though he still loves cows and milk. He is a farm owner and psychologist living near Harlan, Iowa. To contact your pet, go to: www.agbehavioralhealth.com.

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

Ritter Pharma (RTTR) Announces New Patents for its Lactose Intolerance Treatment, RP-G28; Offers an Update on… – StreetInsider. com


Ritter Pharma (RTTR) Announces New Patents because of its Lactose Intolerance Treatment, RP-G28; Provides an Upgrade on…
StreetInsider. com
“We are very happy to add these additional issued patents to our portfolio of issued and pending claims, providing both validation and protection for our compound, RP-G28, in development for the treatment of lactose intolerance , ” stated Michael Step, CEO

and more  »

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

Lactic intolerance tips: How to treat, what to eat – Newsday

Most people with lactose intolerance can enjoy some dairy food without symptoms. (Credit: Dreamstime)

People with lactose intolerance are unable to fully digest the sugar (lactose) in milk. As a result, they have diarrhea, gas plus bloating after eating or consuming dairy products.

The condition, which is also called lactose malabsorption, is usually harmless, but its symptoms can be uncomfortable.

A deficiency of lactase — a good enzyme produced in your small intestine — is usually…

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

This Milk Company Is Willing To Bet You’re Not Actually Lactose… – Fast Company

In 2016, overall sales of milk slipped 5%, representing a loss of greater than a billion dollars for dairy makers. That caps more than 10 years of declining sales of conventional milk. Amid a new environment in which greater than 25% of Americans now recognize as lactose intolerant (and a lot more others avoiding animal products), the particular stuff from cows is dropping market share to “alternative milks. ” To stop the churn, the industry has fallen to desperate measures: A Wisconsin state legislator recently introduced the Dairy Pride Act, which would place limits on what exactly deserves to be called “milk, ” claiming that many nut, seed, plant, and algae alternatives are often less nutritious, which may mislead customers about their health benefits and damage the inherent associated with that once classically cow-made drink.

One bovine-based company has brought a different tactic: Why not sell actual milk to those supposedly lactose intolerant people instead? That’s the guarantee of The a2 Milk Company, an Australia-based venture, which formally inserted the U. S. market within 2015 after success in Australia and China. The company’s basic discussion is that while milk may cause digestive system issues, most Americans who believe they are lactose intolerant actually are not.

Lactose-fearing consumers have their own internal “feedback mechanism” to tell pretty quickly if the drink works or not. [Photo: A2]“The reality is, research shows only 4% to 5% of people in the Oughout. S. are really lactose intolerant, ” says a2 Milk U. Ersus. CEO Blake Waltrip. “So what that leaves is a huge swath of shoppers, say 65 million or seventy million people in the U. Ersus., who have a milk intolerance which is very likely not lactose-[based]. It’s something else. ” Waltrip’s big bet is that the true problem is from contact with what’s called A1 beta-casein protein, which only certain cows produce and has also been linked to digestion issues. While it’s only associated with two-thirds of cows, the milk sector combines product from numerous herds into large batches, so A2 gets swirled into nearly almost everything that’s offered in traditional cartons plus gallons at the grocery store.

To solve that, a2 Milk doesn’t source from A1 protein-making cows at all. They recruit farmers in order to corral only those capable of producing a differently structured variation called A2, which one-third of cows can still do. The result is still milk. It has the exact same nutritional value any A1 iteration. Other than this version should be drinkable by nearly everyone.

Cows didn’t use to cause this kind of trouble. Approximately 1, 000 years ago, scientists hypothesize that cows produced only what’s been classified as A2 beta-casein, a different type of protein that did not cause any stomach problems. That changed with industrial farming practices, when herds were rounded up, carefully bred often , and put into milking lines to increase yields. At some point, there was a genetic mutation that occurred inside some European herds, leading to lineages that now produce either entirely A1-based proteins or an A1 and A2 blend, along with just A2-specific cows from those who do not carry the trait. “The A1 protein is very likely the culprit creating that gut inflammation in these people’s systems, and that creates symptoms that imitate the same kinds of symptoms you would experience if you were lactose intolerant, ” Waltrip says.

Sales of specialty milk possess risen 16% year-over-year as of late 03. [Photo: A2]To avoid that, a2 Milk producers start with a bovine genetic test (it requires a curly hair sample) to spot A2-specific cows, and then milks those separately, requiring farmers to segregate their herds and do numerous tests to ensure everything continues to be pure during processing.

It’s a complicated selling point that eventually requires a leap of faith. “I sometimes say this is… a completely natural innovation, ” says Waltrip, who notes tactfully that lactose-fearing customers have their own internal “feedback mechanism” to tell pretty quickly if the beverage works or not. “If I have a milk sensitivity, I’m going to know within the hour or two whether this solved my problem, and I think that is pretty phenomenal in terms of consumer benefit, ” he says. (For the report, Waltrip used to avoid conventional milk because of his own digestive issues, which appear linked to A1 sensitivity. He now happily drinks his own item. )

The a2 Milk Company’s offerings cost in regards to a third more than conventional milk, just as much as $1. 50 more per gallon. Because it has the same nutritional user profile as any other milk, though, this solves the alt-milk nutrition issue: The exact product claim is “six times more calcium than me llaman milk, eight times more protein of almond milk, and six times more potassium than rice milk. ” That still does not help consumers who might be uncomfortable with the ecological footprint of dairy products operations, but it does help struggling maqui berry farmers. Waltrip says he pays his ranches a premium to do the work due to the fact it’s more intensive.

Within supermarket, A2 lives alongside lactose-free options in the specialty milk class; sales in that category have risen 16% year-over-year as of late March. In 2016, the company, which is also available in Australia and China, earned $222 million worldwide. In the first half of 2017, overall sales are up 84% year-over-year. They’re now expanding country wide through a network of different retailers which includes Whole Foods, Sprouts, Safeway, Kroger, Target, Trader Joe’s, and Publix.

Waltrip knows a thing or two about selling seemingly healthful groceries. He worked previously as the TOP DOG of Ancient Harvest, which provides quinoa-based foods, and before that as chief marketing officer on Celestial Seasonings tea. He also supports the Dairy Act. “We… agree that plant-based alternatives must not be able to use the term ‘milk, ’” he writes in an email, observing that “plant-based alternatives do not deliver… nutritional benefits in the same way. ” (That’s not to say that innovators can’t offer an even more enticing substitute for some people: Pea-based Ripple, for instance, promises similar proteins levels and 50% more calcium mineral than standard 2% milk. )

As with all aspiring entrepreneurs, Waltrip sees a2 Dairy not just as a milk company yet as something much bigger: growing to capture more of the shopping cart, by means of lines of yogurt, cheese, lotion, and ice cream. Meanwhile, the company already has a line of infant formula that is doing well overseas. “Look, we started as a milk company and that was our foundation, but what we actually are is a dairy nutrition company, ” he says.

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

Natural home remedies: living life with lactose intolerance : Duluth News Tribune

The condition, which is also called lactose malabsorption, is usually harmless, but its symptoms can be uncomfortable.

A deficiency of lactase — an enzyme produced in your own small intestine — is usually responsible for lactose intolerance. Many people have low levels of lactase but are able to digest milk products without problems. If you’re actually lactose intolerant, though, your lactase deficiency leads to symptoms after you eat dairy food items.

Most people with lactic intolerance can manage the condition without having to quit all dairy foods.

With some trial and error, you may be able to predict your body’s response to different foods containing lactose and figure out how much you can eat or drink without discomfort. Few people have such severe lactose intolerance that they have to cut out many milk products and be wary of nondairy foods or medications that contain lactose.

The signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance usually begin 30 minutes to two hours after eating or consuming foods that contain lactose. Common signs include:

— Diarrhea

— Nausea, plus sometimes, vomiting

— Abdominal cramps

— Bloating

— Gas

Ways to change your diet to minimize symptoms of lactose intolerance include:

— Limit dairy products

Most people with lactose intolerance can enjoy some milk products without having symptoms. It may be possible to increase your tolerance to dairy products by steadily introducing them into your diet. Some people find that they can tolerate full-fat milk products, such as whole milk and cheese, easier than dairy products with no or reduced fat.

— Choosing smaller servings of dairy. Drink small servings of milk — up to 4 ounces (118 milliliters) at a time. The smaller the serving, the particular less likely it is to cause gastrointestinal difficulties.

— Saving dairy for mealtimes. Drink milk along with other foods. This slows the digestive process and may lessen symptoms of lactose intolerance.

— Experimenting with selection of dairy products. Not all dairy products have the same amount of lactose. For example , hard cheeses, for example Swiss or cheddar, have small amounts of lactose and generally cause no symptoms. You may be able to endure cultured milk products, such as yogurt, because the bacteria used in the culturing procedure naturally produce the enzyme that will breaks down lactose.

— Buying lactose-reduced or lactose-free products. You can find these products for the most part supermarkets in the refrigerated dairy section.

— Using lactase enzyme tablets or drops. Over-the-counter tablets or drops containing the lactase enzyme (Dairy Ease, Lactaid, others) may help you digest dairy products. You may make tablets just before a meal or snack. Or the drops can be added to a carton of milk. Not everybody with lactose intolerance is helped by these products.

MAINTAIN GREAT NUTRITION

Reducing the dairy products doesn’t mean you can’t get enough calcium. Calcium is found in many other foods, such as:

— Broccoli

— Calcium-fortified products, such as breads and fruit juices

— Canned fish

— Milk substitutes, such as soy milk and rice milk

— Oranges

— Pinto beans

— Rhubarb

— Spinach

Also make sure you get enough calciferol, which is typically supplied in fortified milk. Eggs, liver and fat free yogurt also contain vitamin D, and your body makes vitamin D when you spend time under the sun. Even without restricting dairy meals, though, many adults don’t get enough vitamin D. Talk to your doctor about acquiring vitamin D and calcium supplements to be sure.

WHEN TO SEE A DOCTOR

Make an appointment with your doctor if you often have symptoms of lactose intolerance after consuming dairy foods, particularly if you’re worried about getting enough calcium.

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

Home cures: living life with lactose intolerance | Health/Fitness… – Journal Times

People with lactose intolerance are unable to completely digest the sugar (lactose) in milk. As a result, they have diarrhea, gas and bloating after eating or even drinking dairy products.

The condition, which is also called lactose malabsorption, is usually harmless, but its symptoms can be uncomfortable.

A deficiency of lactase �” an enzyme produced in your little intestine �” is usually responsible for lactic intolerance. Many people have low levels of lactase but are able to digest milk products easily. If you�™re actually lactose intolerant, though, your lactase deficiency leads to symptoms after you eat dairy foods.

Most people with lactose intolerance can manage the condition without having to give up many dairy foods.

With some trial and error, you may be capable of predict your body�™s response to different foods containing lactose and work out how much you can eat or consume without discomfort. Few people have such severe lactose intolerance that they have to cut out most of milk products and be wary of nondairy foods or medications that contain lactose.

The signs and symptoms of lactose intolerance usually begin 30 minutes to two hours after eating or drinking foods that contain lactose. Common signs and symptoms include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Nausea, and sometimes, vomiting
  • Abdominal cramps
  • Bloating
  • Gas

Ways to change your diet to minimize symptoms of lactose intolerance include:

Limit dairy products. Most people with lactose intolerance can also enjoy some milk products without symptoms. It may be possible to increase your tolerance to dairy products by gradually introducing them into your diet. Some people find that they can tolerate full-fat dairy products, such as whole milk and cheese, more easily than dairy products with no or reduced fat.

Selecting smaller servings of dairy. Sip small servings associated with milk �” up to 4 oz . (118 milliliters) at a time. The smaller the particular serving, the less likely it is to trigger gastrointestinal problems.

Conserving milk for mealtimes. Drink milk with other foods. This particular slows the digestive process and might lessen symptoms of lactose intolerance.

Experimenting with a variety of dairy products. Not all dairy products have the same amount of lactose. For example , hard cheeses, such as Swiss or cheddar, have small amounts of lactose and generally cause no symptoms. You may be able to tolerate cultured milk products, like yogurt, because the bacteria used in the culturing process naturally produce the particular enzyme that breaks down lactose.

Purchasing lactose-reduced or lactose-free products. You can find these products at most grocery stores in the refrigerated dairy section.

Making use of lactase enzyme tablets or drops. Over-the-counter tablets or even drops containing the lactase chemical (Dairy Ease, Lactaid, others) might help you digest dairy products. You can take tablets just before a meal or snack. Or the drops can be added to a carton associated with milk. Not everyone with lactose intolerance is helped by these products.



Get tips on totally free stuff and fun ideas shipped weekly to your inbox


Maintain good nutrition

Reducing the particular dairy products doesn�™t mean you can�™t get enough calcium. Calcium can be found in many other foods, such as:

  • Broccoli
  • Calcium-fortified products, such as bread and juices
  • Discontinued salmon
  • Milk substitutes, such as soy milk and grain milk
  • Oranges
  • Pinto beans
  • Rhubarb
  • Spinach

Also make sure you get enough vitamin D, that is typically supplied in fortified whole milk. Eggs, liver and yogurt also contain vitamin D, and your body can make vitamin D when you spend time in the sun. Also without restricting dairy foods, though, many adults don�™t get sufficient vitamin D. Talk to your doctor about taking vitamin D and calcium supplements to be sure.


When to see a doctor

Make an appointment with your doctor if you frequently have got symptoms of lactose intolerance after eating dairy products foods, particularly if you�™re worried about getting enough calcium.

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

Could More Microbes Equal Relief to get Lactose Intolerance? – Gastroenterology & Endoscopy News


Could More Microbes Equal Relief just for Lactose Intolerance?
Gastroenterology & Endoscopy News
A little more than a month of treatment having a compound that stimulates the growth of gut microbes increases the variety of selected lactose-fermenting bacteria in people with lactose intolerance , potentially paving the way for the initial microbiome

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

Lactic intolerance symptoms: If you have this reaction you need to… – Daily Star


pouring milk GETTY

WARNING: If you’re lactose intolerant you should quit milk entirely

Dairy is a confusing topic, while some say it must be consumed as part of a healthy diet others think it should be cut altogether.

For years we’ve been told milk is a great source of calcium and will assist our bones and teeth develop stronger.

However , you can find an increasing number of studies that prove milk is actually bad for your health.

A 2014 study of more than 61, 000 women found those who drank a lot of milk were actually in a much higher risk of bone fractures.

Women between the ages of 26-46 who consume a large amount of dairy will also be more likely to get breast cancer, according to a study based on 4, 312 cases.

Aside from that, there’s the fact that drinking another animals milk is a bit weird.

We are the only types that continues to drink milk after infancy and definitely the only species whom drinks it from another animal.

Further disturbing correctly revealed that some milk (particularly in the US) contains ingredients, for example bovine growth hormone, faeces and remedies.

These might be some of the reasons consumption of dairy in the UK provides dropped by 30% over the last two decades, with soy, rice and nut milks enjoying a surge in popularity.

woman drinking milk GETTY

HEALTH RISK: Women who have drink a lot of milk are more likely to obtain breast cancer

Although many people now have a tolerance to dairy, one in five still have some kind of intolerance.

And around 5% of the inhabitants are lactose intolerant – meaning the body can’t easily digest lactose, a natural type of sugar found in milk.

If you think you’re lactose intolerant you should cut milk out of your diet immediately.

MAN TUMMY PAIN GETTY

SYMPTOMS: Stomach cramping and pains could be a sign of a lactose intolerance

Symptoms of lactose intolerance generally develop within a few hours associated with consuming food or drink that contains lactose. They may include:

1 . Flatulence (wind)
2 . Diarrhoea
3. Bloated tummy
4. Tummy cramps and pains
5. Stomach rumbling
6. Feeling sick

The severity of the symptoms will depend on how much you have ingested and how sensitive you are to it.

Some people will be able to drink a small glass of milk still and feel fine, while others can’t even have a splash in their tea or coffee.

Another ‘health’ drink you should steer clear of is smoothies. Just because they are packed with fruit and vegetables does not mean it’s low in calories as well as good for you.

Obviously consuming five or more portions of fruit and veg is recommended and on the whole they may be low in calories and high in nutritional vitamins, minerals and fibre.

However , without proper nutritional knowledge you could be packing your daily drink with unhealthy extras.

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

Non-dairy sources of calcium for vegans plus lactose intolerant people – Metro

It’s surprisingly straightforward (Picture: Shutterstock/Getty)

With the news that ‘clean eating’ regimes are actually causing the sluggish decay of your insides, you’re probably wondering – how on earth do we stay fit?

A survey by the National Osteoporosis Society has found that 40% of young adults have got tried diets in which they cut out dairy, gluten, grain and sugars, and more than a fifth had significantly restricted their intake of milk and cheese.

The automatic reaction to this would probably be to assume from these findings that a vegan diet is bad for you. If you have lactose intolerance or even a cow’s milk allergy, you might also be worried that you’ll develop osteoporosis.

However , this really is not the case.

This is what brittle bones does to your body over time (Picture: Getty Images)

So-called ‘clean eating’ is the avoidance of all processed foods, whilst veganism – as far as food is concerned – is simply following a plant-based diet, avoiding all pet products. This can (and often does) include a lot of processed food.

Dairy-free so-called ‘clean eating’ could be putting your health at risk

In fact a lot of vegan staples, such as almond and soya milks, would be shunned by clean eaters as they are processed.

So how would you navigate this minefield? What if you want to avoid cruelty to animals, yet don’t want to sacrifice your bone fragments?

Fortunately, it’s pretty straightforward. Here are some alternative sources of bone-healthy vitamins, so you can look after yourself even though you’re vegan or lactose intolerant.


What do you have to keep your bones healthy?

Calcium, calcium, calcium.

Calcium is a big participant when it comes to your bone health – but it’s not the only thing.

Vitamin D is also crucial for good bone tissue health, as are vitamins K, proteins and potassium.

To find the best possible bone health, you need a combination of all of these.

But is it just about eating loads of calcium?

Almonds are an incredible source of calcium mineral (Picture: Getty Images)

Not really. You should also try and avoid sources of calcium mineral that are bound to a substance known as ‘oxalate’, which actually hinders calcium supplement absorption.

Best almond milk tip How to reside dairy-free and stay healthy

Whilst cow’s milk is very high in calcium supplement, it is also not that easily immersed in the human body.

This actually makes many low-oxalate veggies, such as rocket, cabbage and kale, as good as animal milks when it comes to calcium absorption.

You should also prevent eating too much salt and coffee – both of which have been shown to inhibit calcium uptake.

So where can you get easily-absorbed calcium?

ROCKET, CABBAGE, BROKKOLI, KALE, BEANS…

Rocket is a surprisingly good source of calcium (Picture:

Low-oxalate veggies are a great shout for vegan calcium sources.

If the phrase ‘low-oxalate vegetables’ puts you away from, just think: green and leafy veg.

This includes spring produce, kale, broccoli and cabbage – which are all great sources of calcium supplement, as well as vitamin K.

Red kidney beans are also excellent

Similarly, red kidney coffee beans and black-eyed beans are remarkably good sources of calcium.

A 100g serving of reddish kidney beans contains around 8% of your RDA (recommended daily allowance) of calcium.

Nevertheless , you can leave spinach and chard off this list, as they’re both high in oxalates. (They are usually, however , great sources of iron – so keep them on your plate. )

FORTIFIED FOODS LIKE PLANT MILKS AND TOFU

Most plant milks are fortified with vitamins (Picture: Alpro)

Most plant milks that you can buy in shops are fortified with vitamins B12, B2 and D, and are very good sources of calcium.

It’s now possible to purchase milk made from soya, almonds, cashews, oats, coconuts, rice, or even hemp. They all have different textures, preferences and consistencies, so you can find the one particular you like the best.

Same goes for soya and coconut yogurt, almond milk ice cream, and soya cream.

Mmm… tofu

Tofu is another good way to obtain calcium – especially when the brand uses calcium sulphate as a coagulant. This is known as ‘calcium-set tofu’.

(For background, tofu is made using soya beans, water, as well as a ‘coagulant’ – a curdling agent. )

While it depends upon what specific brand of tofu you’re buying, most mainstream brands are calcium-set.

In fact , you only need 33g of tofu to get 100mg of calcium – 10% of the RDA.

NUTS (ESPECIALLY ALMONDS)

Nuts – walnuts in particular – are also a really good source of calcium. A 42g serving can get you 10% of your calcium RDA.

If you’re buying almond milk, even better.

CHICKPEAS AND TAHINI

Tahini is extremely rich in calcium (Picture: Getty Images)

Yum. A 217g helping of boiled chickpeas gets you 100mg of calcium – once again, around 10% of your RDA. Prepare them with some fortified plant milk or soya cream to make a creamy Indian channa curry.

Or, alternatively, stick them in a blender with some olive oil, parsley, green chillis and tahini – an incredible supply of calcium – to make hummus.

You only need a small 15g serving of tahini to get 10% of your RDA of calcium, therefore heap a couple of tablespoons in to create your hummus nice and creamy – and calcium-rich.

CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS

If in doubt – consider supplements (Picture: Getty)

This one is pretty obvious.

If you’re still concerned that you’re not getting enough calcium in your diet, make sure you take supplements.

It’s easy to buy combination calcium and vitamin D tablets, which are aimed specifically in bone health.

So if I get enough calcium then I won’t obtain osteoporosis?

Not really.

Osteoporosis is genetic – meaning it can be inherited genetically – so if you have a family history associated with osteoporosis or osteomalacia, you should keep an eye fixed on your health regardless of your diet.

Posted in Lactose in the News0 Comments

Recent Posts

My Experience